By Andrew Bowen

Half of those living with HIV in the US will be over 50 by 2015. Many long-term survivors never expected to live so long and are struggling with symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Andrew Bowen reports from San Francisco.

Tez Anderson smiles as he greets a small group of friends at Church Street Cafe in the Castro, San Francisco’s historically gay neighborhood. It’s Saturday morning, and his activist group is holding its weekly social meet-up.

“It’s a very informal gathering, no agenda topics, we just hang out and chat,” says Anderson. “It’s a purely social time for everybody to hang out and discuss whatever’s on their minds.”

Read the rest of the story here on Deutsche Welle’s website (It is German but in English): http://www.dw.de/aids-survivors-struggle-with-having-a-future/a-18091699

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Andrew also did this amazing “Distillations” podcast

Listen to it here: Life with HIV: Success without a Cure? 

Thirty years ago an HIV diagnosis was a death sentence. Today, sophisticated drug cocktails known as highly active antiretroviral therapy, or HAART, have dramatically changed the fates of people with the disease.

Yet in many ways we’re treading water: each year the U.S. sees around 50,000 new HIV cases, and estimates show that 20-25% of these people don’t know they’re infected. And, while the drugs are effective, many people throughout the world can’t afford them.

So should we consider our response to HIV a complete success story? This episode of Distillations tries to find the answer.

Our journey begins in San Francisco’s Castro District, the epicenter of the city’s HIV epidemic in the 1980s. Reporter Andrew Bowen talks to AIDS activist Tez Anderson, who started an organization to combat AIDS Survivor Syndrome.

Then we talk to Dr. Mark W. Kline and Andrew P. Rice, a physician and a virologist who have been working on HIV since the 1980s, and ask them if we can claim victory.

http://www.chemheritage.org/discover/media/distillations/194-life-with-hiv-success-without-a-cure.aspx